VaquitaCPR Field Operation Period Ends; Scientists Report on Operation Outcomes
13 de Noviembre, 2017


“While field operations end today, VaquitaCPR stands for Conservation, Protection and Recovery of the vaquita porpoise” said Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, lead scientist from SEMARNAT for CIRVA and a lead scientist with VaquitaCPR “We will not give up, we will continue our efforts to save the vaquita."

SAN FELIPE, BAJA, MEXICO -- The Mexican government (SEMARNAT) and scientists from VaquitaCPR said today that field operations in the Gulf of California have come to a close as planned on November 10. 

This weekend, VaquitaCPR, alongside an independent review panel, will carefully review the results of the field operations and will determine, through the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA), the next actions for the conservation, protection and recovery of the endangered porpoise, and will then notify the Mexican government through a technical recommendation.

VaquitaCPR operations started in october and the team of 65 scientists from 9 countries was on the water for five full days and eight partial days during the operational time frame. Partial days occurred when winds were too great for safe and effective field work during part of the day. Conditions on 11 days were too windy for any field work to occur.

Scientists reported vaquita sightings on 8 out of 13 field days. In total, 32 confirmed sighting events of vaquitas were recorded, including probable repeat sightings over the course of a day. It is important to note that these sightings do not represent a population estimate. Sighting events involved one to three vaquitas, with an average group size of about two individuals. VaquitaCPR rescue teams deployed nets on three days and two vaquitas were captured during field operations .

The first animal, an immature female, was released after veterinarians determined she was not adapting to human care. The second animal, a mature female, that wasn’t pregnant or lactating, was released after not being able to adapt to human care at “El Nido”. During the second release emergency medical care was required. Despite heroic efforts by the veterinary team to save the animal’s life, she did not survive. A necropsy (animal autopsy) was performed and samples were submitted for further analyses to better understand the cause of death. A full report will be issued when all information and analysis is complete. Fresh tissue samples from both specimens were transferred to specialized laboratories for genetic studies and tissue culture.

Because of the vaquita’s reaction towards human care, VaquitaCPR lead scientists made a unanimous recommendation to an independent review panel of experts to cease the capture portion of the operation. The independent review panel agreed with this recommendation. VaquitaCPR suspended catch operations on November 4 and changed the operational focus to conducting photographic identification of individual animals, to better refine our understanding of abundance and ranging patterns.

Acoustic recording devices (CPODs) have been used throughout the VaquitaCPR project to help detect and locate vaquitas. A sampling grid of 36 sites was designed to monitor vaquita acoustic activities in the previously known zone of high activity. The sites covered mainly the central, southwest and west portions of the Vaquita Refuge. Acoustic detectors were deployed in this grid on October 11 and were exchanged daily when weather allowed. Due to the dynamics of the acoustic detections, it was decided to deploy eight more acoustic detectors in the northeast portion of the Refuge on October 29. Hence, the grid was expanded to a total of 44 monitoring sites. In total, 112 acoustic encounters with vaquitas were gathered from 21 of the 44 sampling sites. Acoustic activity was very localized, mainly occurring in 5 sites. Scientists used the acoustic encounters to determine which areas to focus on during efforts to locate vaquitas and this information can be used to concentrate long-term protection and monitoring efforts. Similar to sighting events, acoustic detections do not represent a population estimate.

“Vaquita conservation is part of the President’s agenda and will remain a top priority ” said Mexico’s Minister of the Environment Rafael Pacchiano Alamán in an interview yesterday.

Conservation projects supported by the Mexican Government through the Ministry of the Environment (SEMARNAT) and the Mexican Navy (SEMAR) have also been working alongside of VaquitaCPR for the conservation of the vaquita. These projects include support for gillnet ban enforcement and gillnet removal, key conservation elements for the long term survival of vaquita.

“While field operations end today, VaquitaCPR stands for Conservation, Protection and Recovery of the vaquita porpoise” said Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, lead scientist from SEMARNAT for CIRVA and a lead scientist with VaquitaCPR “We will not give up, we will continue our efforts to save the vaquita."

# # #

VaquitaCPR is an international conservation program led by SEMARNAT in coordination with the National Marine Mammal Foundation, The Marine Mammal Center, and the Chicago Zoological Society. Key collaborators in Mexico include Instituto Nacional de Ecología and Climate Change  (INECC), Asociación Mexicana de Hábitats para la Interacción y Protección de Mamíferos Marinos (AMHMAR), Museo de la Ballena, and Baja Aqua Farms. United States collaborators include Duke University and the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contributing technical support. World Wildlife Fund is contributing with acoustic monitoring and the retrieval of lost or abandoned “ghost” nets from vaquita habitat. European collaborators include Dolfinarium Harderwijk, Aarhus University, and Fjord&Baelt.  Additional support and expertise has been offered from Dolphin Quest, SeaWorld, and the Vancouver Aquarium. VaquitaCPR operates as a private and public partnership, relying on both individual donors and government grants. VaquitaCPR has received generous financial support from the Mexican government, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Global Wildlife Conservation, Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks & Aquariums, Africam, International Marine Animal Trainer’s Association, Waitt Foundation, Disney Conservation Fund, YAQU PACHA, and the Firedoll Foundation. For information about the plan, visit http://www.nmmf.org/vaquitacpr-espanol.html

To support the rescue effort, learn more about the vaquita and for information about VaquitaCPR, visit VaquitaCPR.org

 

 

The entire VaquitaCPR team is deeply saddened to report that during field operations to rescue the world’s most critically endangered marine mammal, a vaquita porpoise has died.
5 de Noviembre, 2017


SAN FELIPE, BAJA, MEXICO --  With less than 30 vaquitas left on Earth, the entire rescue team is heartbroken by this devastating loss. 

Extreme precautions and significant planning have gone into every aspect of the VaquitaCPR rescue plan. VaquitaCPR assembled many of the most experienced marine mammal experts in the world to determine if human care could rescue them from extinction. No conservation project like this has ever been done before, and the operation comes with significant risk. However, scientists agreed that the risk of extinction in the wild was still far greater than the risk of rescue efforts.

A mature female vaquita, not pregnant or lactating, had been caught and transported successfully late in the afternoon on Saturday in the Northern Gulf of California and was taken to a specially-modified floating sea pen known as ElNido, or The Nest. From the moment of capture, the vaquita was under constant care and observation for its health and safety. Marine mammal veterinarians monitoring the vaquita's health noticed the animal's condition began to deteriorate and made the determination to release. The release attempt was unsuccessful and life saving measures were adminsitered.  Despite the heroic efforts of the veterinary team, the vaquita did not survive.

Every member of the international rescue team is a leading expert in their field and deeply committed to saving the vaquita from imminent extinction. The rescue operation was considered a great hope for the continued existence of this rare and elusive porpoise which is at severe risk of extinction due to entanglement and drowning in gillnets in Mexico’s Gulf of California. Hundreds of vaquitas have been lost since 1997 despite significant efforts by the Mexican government to ban gillnet fishing throughout the vaquitas’ range and establish strong enforcement of conservation measures. Illegal gillnet fishing continues.

With so few vaquitas left, this consortium of international conservation and animal care experts was assembled at the request of the Mexican government and scientific community to develop an unprecedented rescue and relocation operation that is widely recognized as the best hope for vaquitas' existence. The risk of losing a vaquita during field operations was always acknowledged as a possibility, but  it was determined that it was unacceptable to stand by and watch the vaquita porpoise disappear without a heroic attempt at rescue.

Vaquita Conservation, Rescue, and Recovery (VaquitaCPR) scientists in collaboration with an independent review panel established for this purpose and the Mexican government, will carefully review the events of the past 24 hours and determine how best to proceed. A necropsy has been performed and tissue samples have been collected to inform in this review.

Update information will be provided as it becomes available.

# # #

VaquitaCPR is an international conservation program led by SEMARNAT in coordination with the National Marine Mammal Foundation, The Marine Mammal Center, and the Chicago Zoological Society. Key collaborators in Mexico include Instituto Nacional de Ecología and Climate Change  (INECC), Asociación Mexicana de Hábitats para la Interacción y Protección de Mamíferos Marinos (AMHMAR), Museo de la Ballena, and Baja Aqua Farms. United States collaborators include Duke University and the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission, with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration contributing technical support. World Wildlife Fund is contributing with acoustic monitoring and the retrieval of lost or abandoned “ghost” nets from vaquita habitat. European collaborators include Dolfinarium Harderwijk, Aarhus University, and Fjord&Baelt.  Additional support and expertise has been offered from Dolphin Quest, SeaWorld, and the Vancouver Aquarium. VaquitaCPR operates as a private and public partnership, relying on both individual donors and government grants. VaquitaCPR has received generous financial support from the Mexican government, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Global Wildlife Conservation, Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks & Aquariums, Africam, International Marine Animal Trainer’s Association, Waitt Foundation, Disney Conservation Fund, YAQU PACHA, and the Firedoll Foundation. For information about the plan, visit http://www.nmmf.org/vaquitacpr-espanol.html

To support the rescue effort, learn more about the vaquita and for information about VaquitaCPR, visit VaquitaCPR.org

 

 

Vaquita Porpoise Rescued as Part of VaquitaCPR Conservation Project, Then Released
20 de Octubre, 2017


VaquitaCPR Demonstrating Success in Locating Endangered Vaquita Porpoises as Field Operations Continue

SAN FELIPE, BAJA CALIFORNIA – Scientists with the VaquitaCPR conservation project and Mexico's Secretary of the Environment Rafael Pacchiano announced today they succeeded in locating and rescuing a highly endangered vaquita porpoise yesterday, but in an abundance of caution the vaquita, which was a calf, was released. Experts say the calf was being closely monitored by marine mammal veterinarians and showed signs of stress, leading to its release.

"The successful rescue made conservation history and demonstrates that the goal of VaquitaCPR is feasible," said Secretary Pacchiano. "No one has ever captured and cared for a vaquita porpoise, even for a brief period of time. This is an exciting moment and as a result, I am confident we can indeed save the vaquita marina from extinction.

Experts had planned extensively for the scenario that unfolded on Wednesday and every precaution was taken to safeguard the health of the vaquita calf, which was estimated to be about six months old.

"While we were disappointed we could not keep the vaquita in human care, we have demonstrated that we are able to locate and capture a vaquita," said Dr. Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, a senior scientist with SEMARNAT, CIRVA and VaquitaCPR Program Director. "We also succeeded in transporting one and conducting health evaluations that are part of our protocols safeguarding the animals' health."

Scientists returned the vaquita calf to the same spot in the Gulf of California where it was originally located and where other vaquitas were observed. Before releasing the vaquita, various tissue samples were taken which scientists will analyze and share with colleagues at other research institutions like the Frozen Zoo in San Diego, California which will conduct genetic sequencing.

The precedent-setting rescue comes as the bold conservation plan led by the Mexican government (SEMARNAT) to save the endangered vaquita porpoise from extinction enters its second week of field operations. During the first three days, scientists spotted several vaquitas using visual search methods and acoustic monitoring. Vaquitas were repeatedly located by the VaquitaCPR 'find' team.

The vaquita porpoise, also known as the ‘panda of the sea,’ is the most endangered marine mammal in the world. Latest estimates by scientists who have been monitoring the vaquita for decades show there are fewer than 30 vaquitas left in the wild. The vaquita only lives in the upper Gulf of California.

Secretary Pacchiano has visited the VaquitaCPR facilities in San Felipe several times and accompanied scientists during a day of field operations on the Sea of Cortez. "The individuals involved in this unprecedented conservation project are the best in their respective fields," said Secretary Pacchiano. "I've personally witnessed their dedication and incredible expertise. We're all committed to saving the vaquita porpoise and this is the team who can do it."

The project, which has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA), involves locating, rescuing and then temporarily relocating the vaquitas to an ocean sanctuary off the coast of San Felipe. The explicit goal of CPR is to return the vaquitas to their natural habitat once the primary threat to their survival has been eliminated. Experts from all over the globe, including Mexico, the United States, Denmark, the Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom are all working together on VaquitaCPR.

VaquitaCPR field operations, including efforts to locate and bring vaquitas into temporary sea pens, began on October 12 and are expected to continue for several weeks.

Windy conditions prevented VaquitaCPR field operations from taking place at sea for three days. When there are sustained winds of more than about eight knots, conditions on the water are too choppy for scientists to visually locate vaquitas. It also could risk the safety of vaquitas during the capture operation.

"We've unfortunately been at the mercy of the weather and were in the position of 'waiting on the wind' for several days," said Dr. Cynthia Smith, VaquitaCRP Program Manager. "However, the time hasn't been wasted, as there has been a tremendous amount of productive discussion at all hours of the day as we continue to refine the process of rescuing the animals. Now that we're back on the water and conditions are better, the entire team is optimistic and working together seamlessly to support the mission."

In an unprecedented move in April of 2015 that demonstrated Mexico’s commitment to conservation, President Peña Nieto announced a two-year gillnet ban throughout the vaquitas’ range, compensated fishermen and related industries for their loss of income, and enhanced multi-agency enforcement of the ban led by the Mexican Navy.

In June of 2017, the ban on gillnet fishing was made permanent. The government also launched an extensive survey of the vaquita population using an approach that included both visual monitoring and advanced techniques that use sound to locate the animals. All told, the Mexican government has committed more than $100 million in an effort to protect the vaquita and support the local fishing community.

A crucial part of CPR is the acoustic monitoring system that will help to locate the remaining vaquitas. This monitoring has been supported since 2012 by WWF and operated by the National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change of Mexico (INECC) to help estimate the vaquita’s population, and will continue during the CPR operations. WWF will also continue supporting the retrieval of lost or abandoned “ghost” nets, many of them illegal, which drift aimlessly and continue to entangle and kill vaquitas and other marine species. Both the acoustic monitoring and the net retrieval are conducted with the help and experience of local fishermen.

VaquitaCPR is led by Mexico’s Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT). The National Marine Mammal Foundation, Chicago Zoological Society and the Marine Mammal Center are primary partners in this extraordinary conservation effort.

VaquitaCPR operates as a private and public partnership, relying on both private donors and government funds. VaquitaCPR has many key collaborators including the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and groups like the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Baja Aqua Farms, and Museo de la Ballena.

As part of VaquitaCPR, large floating sea pens will be anchored off the coast of San Felipe, where veterinarians and animal care experts will carefully monitor the health of any vaquitas that are successfully rescued. The sea pens have been designed and built by Baja Aqua Farms, a fish farm operation based in Ensenada.

The Museo de la Ballena's mission is to promote the knowledge, study and conservation of cetaceans. Since the museum initiated a conservation operation last year, its vessel has succeeded in retrieving more than 900,000 linear feet of 'ghost' and illegal fishing nets. The museum is providing key logistical support for the VaquitaCPR team.

In order to make the Gulf safe for the vaquita in the future, experts agree it’s important to prevent illegal fishing of the also-endangered totoaba fish and to support alternative economies for the fishing community.

VaquitaCPR has been adopted by Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT) on the recommendation of their expert advisory group, the Comité Internacional Para La Recuperación De La Vaquita (CIRVA).

Dolphin Discovery

 

DOLPHIN DISCOVERY AWARD WINNER AT THE 45 th IMATA CONFERENCE RIVIERA MAYA 2017
11 de Octubre, 2017


The event gathered more than 450 marine mammal specialists from the most important parks of 29 countries.

Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo, October 10, 2017.- For the second time, Dolphin Discovery was the host of the International Marine Animal Trainer’s Association (IMATA) that took place from October 1 st to October 6 in the hotel Iberostar Riviera Maya.

Within the framework of this important event for the industry, the “people’s Choice” award was granted to the person, group, or company that contributed more at the conference according to the participants’ votes. This year, Dolphin Discovery won the award for being the best host in IMATA 2017.

This was thanks to the visit that the participants made to Dolphin Discovery Cozumel, where they watched a special exhibition about dolphin’s behaviors in Dolphin Discovery. During their visit, they had the chance to swim with dolphins and manatees and watch the educational program with sea lions. With all this, they could confirm the quality of the interactive programs of Dolphin Discovery and above all, the importance of the animal’s welfare to the company.

Likewise, the work of Mr. Roberto Sánchez Okrucky, Director of Veterinary Medicine and Investigation of Dolphin Discovery, was given an important recognition thanks to the remarkable investigation he made about stress in dolphins. This was a comparative study of cortisol (stress indicator) between dolphins and horses, before and after an interactive program (in the case of dolphins) and one training session (in the case of horses). He worked with a sample of 35 specimens, divided into 3 groups: a) 1 to 9 years old, b) 10-20 years old, c) more than 20 years old.

“It was observed that in the case of the dolphins there was no significant difference of cortisol that indicates stress in the specimens, compared to the horses, where there existed a big difference of cortisol between the “before” and “after” their training”, said Doctor Roberto Sánchez.

Another one of the presentations given by the Marine Mammal Specialists of Dolphin Discovery was the case of the penguins training and stingrays that live in Gulf World, a park that belongs to Grupo Dolphin Discovery, located in Florida, US. They talked about the obstacles in training this species so that they can cooperate in a voluntary way during their daily physical examinations, ultrasounds (in case of pregnancy), and during the interaction with the guests. They were able to make it through the obstacles after a few weeks thanks to their perseverance and love for these specimens.

During the same day, Dolphin Discovery presented its campaigns “The home of the most loved dolphins” and”#IAmDolphinDiscovery”. These campaigns have as their goal to inform in a transparent and honest way about what goes on behind the stage of each one of the habitats of the Group at a worldwide level, reinforcing their love and concern for the marine mammals under their care.

Later on, the poster of Zoomarine by Dolphin Discovery was presented to the participants, where Mario Libianchi, a specialist of the park located in Italy, explained the specific case of voluntary stomach pumping in the dolphins of this habitat. Also, the importance of this achievement in animal husbandry, since during this process, it was possible to track the changes in the gastric staining that indicates the presence or absence of organic material; a big achievement for the healthcare of the dolphins.

Besides Dolphin Discovery, other companies such as Delfinity, Discovery Cove, Dolphin Adventure, among others, presented subjects like shark training, changes in the behavior of animals with no reason, mothers, and breeding, innovating training techniques, etc. All this with the objective of promotive communication and professionalism through the exchange of investigations and experiences that aim to support the conservation and education of the species.

“Each experience shared during the IMATA 2017 conference is very important for an oriented investigation about the conservation of marine mammals that each one of the companies that are members of this international association carry out in the different habitats around the world”, said Edgar Urbina, Director of the Specialists on Marine Mammals of Dolphin Discovery.

Dolphin Discovery

 

La última esperanza para vaquita marina: cautiverio e inseminación. (Excelsior) - / Enero 11,2017


Ante la inminente extinción de la vaquita marina, cuya población se redujo de 60 a 30 ejemplares, según la última estimación, incluidas sólo ocho hembras en edad reproductiva, el Gobierno de México decidió apostar por un proyecto de alto riesgo para la conservación de esta especie en un sitio confinado dentro de las aguas del Alto Golfo de California, con la ayuda de delfines nariz de botella entrenados para su localización.

Excélsior dio a conocer el pasado 7 de diciembre que estas acciones, sin precedente, que buscan salvar al mamífero marino en mayor peligro del mundo, se realizarán durante el primer trimestre de 2017.

En entrevista, Rafael Pacchiano, titular de la Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (Semarnat), reveló que la Marina de Estados Unidos trabaja de manera coordinada para el adiestramiento de los delfines que ubicarán a los ejemplares en mar abierto. "Sin duda ésta va a ser la última llamada que tenga la vaquita, y como el presidente Enrique Peña Nieto nos instruyó, vamos a hacer todos los esfuerzos que podamos para evitar su extinción”, destacó.

El doctor en Sistemas Acuáticos, Jorge Urbán Ramírez, integrante del Comité Internacional para la Recuperación de la Vaquita (CIRVA) reconoció que no fue fácil tomar la decisión de realizar este procedimiento de conservación Ex situ, para mantener algunos de los últimos ejemplares de la especie en semi cautiverio, pero es una “acción desesperada”, ante el constante declive en su población.

Leer la nota completa

Delphinus apoyó en labores de reintroducción de delfines Steno bredanensis varados en playas de Cancún. - / Diciembre 20


Delphinus, como parte de la Red de Varamientos de Mamíferos Marinos de Quintana Roo que coordina la Procuraduría Federal de Protección al Ambiente apoyó en las labores de reintroducción de varios delfines Stenella Bredanensis o “delfines de dientes rugosos” que vararon en playas de Cancún durante la madrugada del 19 de diciembre.

Ante la convocatoria de las direcciones de Turismo, Protección Civil y de Ecología del municipio de Benito Juárez, 15 especialistas en cuidado y entrenamiento animal de Delphinus de los hábitats Delphinus Punta Cancún y Delphinus Acuario interactivo acudieron al lugar para auxiliar a los mamíferos que después de ser valorados por Médico Veterinario Abril Martínez y dado a que no presentaban heridas de consideración se auxilió a los animales para reintroducirlos al mar de acuerdo al protocolo de la Red de Varamientos. En las labores también participaron integrantes del Heroico Cuerpo de Bomberos y miembros de la Marina, al igual que turistas que pasaban por el lugar.

La Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales otorgó a Delphinus una Mención Especial del Premio al Mérito Ecológico 2016 en la categoría Cultura y Comunicación Ambiental por el Festival de los Océanos del Caribe Mexicano durante la ceremonia llevada a cabo en la ciudad de Cancún en el marco de la Conferencia de las Partes del Convenio sobre la Diversidad Biológica, COP13.

La Red de Varamientos es una fuerza de trabajo que coordina la Procuraduría Federal de Protección al Ambiente (PROFEPA) a nivel federal y estatal en la que se incluyen empresas que tienen colecciones de mamíferos marinos para la interacción con personas y organismos de los tres órdenes de gobierno, así como instituciones académicas.

Recibe Delphinus Mención Especial del Premio al Mérito Ecológico 2016 por Festival de los Océanos. - / Diciembre 6


El gobierno de la República, a través de la Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales, SEMARNAT, otorgó a Delphinus la mención especial del Premio al Mérito Ecológico que es el reconocimiento más importante de nuestro país en materia ambiental.

Ésta distinción reconoce el trabajo a favor de la educación ambiental que Delphinus realiza a través del Festival de los Océanos.

La Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales otorgó a Delphinus una Mención Especial del Premio al Mérito Ecológico 2016 en la categoría Cultura y Comunicación Ambiental por el Festival de los Océanos del Caribe Mexicano durante la ceremonia llevada a cabo en la ciudad de Cancún en el marco de la Conferencia de las Partes del Convenio sobre la Diversidad Biológica, COP13.

La mención especial del premio al Mérito Ecológico es el resultado de los esfuerzos que Delphinus realiza a favor de la Educación Ambiental a través del Festival de los Océanos del Caribe Mexicano que en sus cuatro ediciones ha promovido entre la población de Quintana Roo y sus visitantes el amor por los mares a través de actividades ecológicas, recreativas, gastronómicas y académicas en un gran foro para la divulgación científica, el servicio ambiental, la expresión artística y la promoción turística para nuestros destinos.

"Está Mención Especial del Premio al Mérito Ecológico es un aliciente para Delphinus, para sostener nuestro compromiso con la educación ambiental a través del Festival de los Océanos del Caribe Mexicano, nos dice que vamos por buen camino" señaló Rodrigo Constandse Córdova, director general de Delphinus.

En octubre del 2017 Especialistas compartirán experiencias del mundo marino. - / Diciembre 2


La Riviera Maya será sede de la próxima Conferencia Internacional de Entrenamiento de Animales Marinos (IMATA) que se llevará a cabo en octubre del 2017, y por segundo año en nuestro país.

Al evento se espera la llegada de 500 especialistas, en donde los expertos en el tema se reúnen para compartir experiencias del medio marino.

Dolphin Discovery será la empresa sede, grupo que en el marco de la 44° Conferencia Internacional de Entrenamiento de Animales Marinos (IMATA) celebrada en San Diego, California fue galardonada con el premio “Condicionamiento de Conductas en Mamíferos Marinos”, por la innovación en las técnicas que desarrolla y aplica sobre las capacidades olfativas de Manatíes y Lobos Marinos no antes demostradas. Y en donde José Luis Dorantes y Brenda Castañeda, Especialistas en Mamíferos Marinos de Dolphin Discovery fueron los encargados de presentar esta nueva técnica de condicionamiento que consistió en explorar la capacidad olfativa de los animales; cada olor tenía un significado comportamental, es decir, un valor aprendido.

Durante la premiación se recibieron acreditaciones IMATA a tres locaciones: Saint Kitts, Grand Cayman y Akumal; sumando así 18 parques marinos Dolphin Discovery acreditados por esta asociación.

El sello IMATA es un distintivo de calidad en el cuidado y acondicionamiento de los mamíferos marinos, así como de personal altamente calificado técnica y éticamente hablando. También ofrece oportunidades para que los entrenadores de animales marinos puedan intercambiar y difundir información sobre los conocimientos, la investigación y formación actual en los ámbitos profesionales y laborales.

Otros dos acuarios se integraron a la comunidad IMATA, Delphinus Puerto Morelos y el Acuario Interactivo de Cancún, que tras un proceso de auditoría documental y presencial, cumplen con estrictos estándares para el entrenamiento de los mamíferos marinos establecidos por esta organización.

Delphinus Puerto Morelos y el Acuario Interactivo de Cancún reciben certificación de IMATA - / Diciembre 1


Gracias a la certificación de IMATA Delphinus Puerto Morelos y el Acuario Interactivo de Cancún reafirman su compromiso con el cuidado humano y manejo ético de mamíferos marinos mediante el cumplimiento de los más altos estándares de entrenamiento para el bienestar animal.

Prácticas como la formación, exhibición pública, investigación, cría, conservación y la educación ambiental hicieron a ambos recintos acreedores de la certificación IMATA.

Cancún Quintana Roo a 30 de noviembre de 2016. Delphinus Puerto Morelos y el Acuario Interactivo de Cancún se integran a la comunidad de miembros de la prestigiosa Asociación Internacional de Entrenadores de Animales Marinos, IMATA, por sus siglas en inglés, ya que ambos recintos luego de un proceso de auditoría documental y presencial cumplieron con los estrictos estándares para el entrenamiento de los mamíferos marinos establecidos por esta organización. Éste reconocimiento fue dado a conocer durante la convención anual de IMATA realizado recientemente en la ciudad de San Diego, California.

Y es que la experiencia que los recintos ofrecen al público fomenta la conexión emocional y personal que promueven la conservación de los ambientes y de las especies marinas. En el caso del Acuario Interactivo de Cancún esta conexión se logra a través de experiencias sensoriales en las que los visitantes se sensibilizan acerca de otras formas de vida que existen en el planeta, especialmente de aquellas que no están al alcance cotidiano, promoviendo un vínculo emocional e intelectual con estas especies para crear un compromiso con el cuidado y preservación de los océanos, mismo que comparte Delphinus Puerto Morelos pues gracias a la interacción con los delfines y la experiencia única que éstos generan hacia los visitantes se impulsa el deseo de procurar el bienestar animal y la conservación del planeta.

Premian a Delphinus Puerto Morelos por ser el mejor habitat para la interacción con delfines nariz de botella - / Noviembre 7


En el marco de su XXXIII Congreso, la Asociación de Zoológicos, Criaderos y Acuarios de México (AZCARM) otorgó a Delphinus Puerto Morelos el premio de Mejor Recinto 2016 por considerarlo el mejor lugar para la interacción con delfines nariz de botella (Tursiops truncatus).

De acuerdo con datos proporcionados por la empresa, el reconocimiento fue resultado de las características que tiene el recinto para la convivencia con la vida animal, como el bienestar de los delfines albergados, el impacto educativo al público, la originalidad del diseño y el valor agregado que genera para la conservación y sostenibilidad.

Cabe mencionar que el XXXIII Congreso de la AZCARM se realizó en Veracruz para reconocer los mejores proyectos reproductivos en especies mexicanas, exóticas, así como de educación para la conservación y recintos, entre otras categorías.

En el caso de Delphinus Puerto Morelos, la AZCARM consideró que el bienestar animal se asegura al cumplir con la normatividad mexicana que implica vigilancia diaria de la calidad del agua, manejo profesional del alimento, dieta personalizada para cada delfín, medicina veterinaria preventiva, establecimiento de conductas cooperativas basadas en refuerzo positivo y enriquecimiento ambiental, entre otros elementos.

Asimismo, la sostenibilidad se basa en los materiales utilizados en su construcción, pues la cubierta de los muelles se hizo de ecotablas, cuenta con un módulo de celdas solares que genera entre el 30 y 40% de la energía eléctrica que se consume localmente, a lo que se suma el uso de luces ahorradoras y un sistema de separación de desechos que disminuye la huella o impacto ambiental.

Premian a la AMHMAR como una de las mejores prácticas de Responsabilidad Social Empresarial - / Octubre 13


Con el objetivo de promover mejores condiciones de vida a través del compromiso social empresarial, el Centro Mexicano para la Filantropía (Cemefi) otorgó el reconocimiento de Mejores Prácticas de Responsabilidad Social a las compañías comprometidas en mejorar las condiciones sociales o ambientales de acuerdo a cuatro ámbitos básicos: Calidad de vida en la empresa, Vinculación con la comunidad, Cuidado y Prevención del medio Ambiente y Ética empresarial.

Tras el proceso de selección de proyectos, 46 prácticas en México y 16 más de otras naciones de América Latina fueron reconocidas en el marco del XI Seminario de Mejores Prácticas de Responsabilidad Social Empresarial 2016, entre las que la Asociación Mexicana de Hábitats para la Interacción y Protección de Mamíferos Marino AC, (AMHMAR) fue premiada en la categoría de Cuidado y Prevención del Medio Ambiente; esto se logró como resultado de las diferentes labores realizadas por la organización con la misión de garantizar el bienestar de los mamíferos marinos bajo cuidado humano y contribuir a la protección de las especies y la conservación de los océanos.

Es así que a través de la AMHMAR empresas como Cabo Dolphins, Dolphin Adventure, Dolphinaris, Delfiniti, Delphinus y Dolphin Discovery, unen esfuerzos para garantizar el bienestar animal cumpliendo con los más altos estándares a nivel mundial, haciendo de México un referente internacional en la interacción con mamíferos marinos e incluso algunos de ellos certificados por los principios básicos de la Organización Mundial de Sanidad Animal, asegurando que los mamíferos marinos bajo su cuidado son libres de hambre y sed, libres de incomodidad, libres de dolor y enfermedades, libres de expresar comportamiento anormal y libres de miedo y angustia.

Finaliza con éxito el 2° Congreso Multidisciplinario de Bienestar Animal, organizado por la Asociación Mexicana de Hábitats para la Interacción y Protección de los Mamíferos Marinos (AMHMAR - Octubre 7


La Asociación Mexicana de Hábitats para la Interacción y Protección de los Mamíferos Marinos (AMHMAR), con el apoyo de la Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT) y la American Humane Association, realizaron con gran éxito el Segundo Congreso Multidisciplinario de Bienestar Animal, México 2016. Éste es un espacio que, desde su primera edición, en octubre de 2015, demostró ser un foro para la reflexión y discusión respetuosa, diversa e incluyente, sobre el bienestar de todo tipo de animales, tópico que ha adquirido gran relevancia en la sociedad contemporánea.

La segunda edición del Congreso se llevó a cabo el 5 y 6 de octubre, en World Trade Center de la Ciudad de México, con la participación más de 350 asistentes y, para éste, los organizadores reunieron a expertos internacionales y nacionales, tanto científicos, como técnicos y activistas del más amplio espectro de tendencias e ideologías, quienes se presentaron ante un público interesado en el bienestar de los animales bajo el cuidado e influencia del hombre.

Entre los especialistas que compartieron sus ponencias destacan: Roberto Aguilar de la Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria de la UNAM, Robin Ganzert, Presidenta de la American Humane Association y Brad Andrews, Director Mundial del Programa Humane Conservation de esa asociación, Hugh Felton, Ejecutivo de Turismo Sustentable de la Association of British Travel Agents, Ken Ramírez, reconocido Biólogo experto en conducta y bienestar animal, Jorge Gabriel Villarreal Secretario del Consejo Estatal de Flora y Fauna Silvestre de Nuevo León, A.C. y Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni Catedrático de Ciencias Marinas en la Universidad Interamericana de Puerto Rico, entre otros de igual calidad.